CACTES

Technology Integration for teachers

Technology Integration with Evernote: Collaboration

 

Collaborating:
This is where we take a simple set of notebooks and take them to the next level. This is the point where Evernote shines as a teaching tool. One of the options available for notebooks is to share a notebook with another Evernote account. When you decide to share a notebook the recipient receives an invitation through email and through the Evernote application. When the other account accepts the invitation, he or she has instant access to all notes placed in that notebook. The notes are synced as often as Evernote syncs, or whenever the writer initiates a manual sync.

When sharing you have the option to have the notebook be read only. This means the person can only see the notebook content and won’t be able to change anything. Another option is to allow the invited person to modify the contents. This doesn’t mean that individuals can collaboratively create a document at the same time. Notes are not synchronous. If you want to make a notebook where an invited account can modify content, you will need to set workflow guidelines. At this point I don’t recommend sharing a notebook with modification rights. Wait until you feel more comfortable with this workflow. I will cover workflow in greater detail later. Use a combination of web share and individual sharing. Share as many notebooks as necessary.

Teacher and student collaboration:
What does this mean for teacher and student collaboration? As a teacher you can share a notebook for homework assignments, classroom assignments, or quizzes and projects. Students can refer to these notebooks or copy and paste any content into their own notebook. Remember, student’s should not have rights to modify a shared notebook from you.

From the student perspective the process is very similar. Students will share a notebooks with you. These notebooks can have similar formats. Students can share a homework or daily assignment notebook.

 

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